Borderline thyroid function tests: so easy to look at, so hard to define

Ann Clin Biochem 2006;43:77-79
doi:10.1258/000456306775141669
© 2006 Association for Clinical Biochemistry

 

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Case Reports


Zahra Khatami,
Graham Handley,
Helene Brandon and
Jolanta Weaver


Department of Biochemistry, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead NHS Foundation Trust, Sheriff Hill, Gateshead NE96SX, UK;
Department of Biochemistry, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead NHS Foundation Trust, Sheriff Hill, Gateshead NE96SX, UK;
Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead NHS Foundation Trust, Sheriff Hill, Gateshead NE96SX, UK;
Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead NHS Foundation Trust, Sheriff Hill, Gateshead NE96SX, UK

Thyroid function tests are the most commonly requested endocrineinvestigations in both primary and secondary care. Attentionto detail is vital, as the appropriate interpretation may pointto conditions other than thyroid disease itself. We describetwo cases of hypopituitarism masquerading as borderline thyroidfunction tests.


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