The biochemical assessment of insulin resistance

Ann Clin Biochem 2007;44:324-342
doi:10.1258/000456307780945778
© 2007 Association for Clinical Biochemistry

 

This Article
Right arrow

Full Text (PDF)

Right arrow
Alert me when this article is cited
Right arrow
Alert me if a correction is posted
Services
Right arrow
Email this article to a friend
Right arrow

Similar articles in this journal

Right arrow
Similar articles in PubMed
Right arrow
Alert me to new issues of the journal
Right arrow
Download to citation manager
Right arrow
Citing Articles
Right arrow
Citing Articles via HighWire
Right arrow Citing Articles via Google Scholar
Google Scholar
Right arrow
Articles by Borai, A.
Right arrow
Articles by Ferns, G. A A
Right arrow Search for Related Content
PubMed
Right arrow
PubMed Citation
Social Bookmarking

What’s this?

Review Article


Anwar Borai,
Callum Livingstone and
Gordon A A Ferns


Centre for Clinical Science and Measurement, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK;
Centre for Clinical Science and Measurement, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK; SAS Peptide Hormone Section, Clinical Biochemistry Department, Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Trust, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XX, UK;
Centre for Clinical Science and Measurement, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK

Insulin resistance is a common condition, recognized to be acentral feature of the metabolic syndrome, and strongly associatedwith an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.The quantitative assessment of insulin sensitivity is not usedfor routine clinical purposes, but the emerging importance ofinsulin resistance has led to its wider application to researchstudies that have examined its pathogenesis, aetiology and consequences.The gold standard method for the determination of insulin sensitivityis the euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp from which indicesof insulin sensitivity can be derived. The clamp technique isboth expensive and complex to undertake and has prompted theuse of surrogate methods, notably the insulin tolerance testand frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Indicesmay be derived from these methods and correlate well with thosederived from clamp studies. Indices can also be derived frommeasurements made during a standard oral glucose tolerance testand from one-off fasting specimens (e.g. homeostasis model assessmentand quantitative insulin sensitivity check index). These indiceslend themselves for use in large population studies where arelatively simple, inexpensive assessment is necessary. However,these tests all suffer from important limitations, includingpoor precision. Insulin resistance is increasingly being assessedin clinical situations, where relatively simple markers arerequired. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 is anemerging marker which may be useful in this context.


CiteULike    Complore    Connotea    Del.icio.us    Digg    Reddit    Technorati    What’s this?






This article has been cited by other articles:

Home page Ann Clin BiochemHome page

A. Borai, C. Livingstone, H. Zarif, and G. Ferns
Serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1: an improvement over other simple indices of insulin sensitivity in the assessment of subjects with normal glucose tolerance
Ann Clin Biochem,

March 1, 2009;

46(2):

109 – 113.

[Abstract]
[Full Text]
[PDF]


Home page Eur J EndocrinolHome page

F. Chiarelli and M. L. Marcovecchio
Insulin resistance and obesity in childhood
Eur. J. Endocrinol.,

December 1, 2008;

159(suppl_1):

S67 – S74.

[Abstract]
[Full Text]
[PDF]


Home page J. Clin. Pathol.Home page

R Olufadi and C D Byrne
Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome
J. Clin. Pathol.,

June 1, 2008;

61(6):

697 – 706.

[Abstract]
[Full Text]
[PDF]