Biochemical detection of phaeochromocytoma: why are we continuing to ignore the evidence?

Ann Clin Biochem 2008;45:6-10
doi:10.1258/acb.2007.007116
© 2008 Association for Clinical Biochemistry

 

This Article
Right arrow
Figures Only
Right arrow
Full Text
Right arrow

Full Text (PDF)

Right arrow
Alert me when this article is cited
Right arrow
Alert me if a correction is posted
Services
Right arrow
Email this article to a friend
Right arrow

Similar articles in this journal

Right arrow
Similar articles in PubMed
Right arrow
Alert me to new issues of the journal
Right arrow
Download to citation manager
Right arrow
Citing Articles
Right arrow
Citing Articles via HighWire
Right arrow Citing Articles via Google Scholar
Google Scholar
Right arrow
Articles by Peaston, R. T
Right arrow
Articles by Ball, S.
Right arrow Search for Related Content
PubMed
Right arrow
PubMed Citation
Social Bookmarking

What’s this?

Personal View


Robert T Peaston 1  and
Stephen Ball 2 3


1 Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle Hospitals NHS Trust, Newcastle NE7 7DN;
2 School of Clinical Medical Sciences;
3 Department of Endocrinology, Newcastle University, Newcastle Hospitals NHS Trust, Newcastle NE1 4LP, UK


Corresponding author: Dr Robert T Peaston. Email: bob.peaston{at}nuth.nhs.uk

Phaeochromocytomas are rare tumours that require considerationamong large numbers of patients with hypertension. If not diagnosed,the excessive secretion of catecholamines by these tumours cancause considerable morbidity and mortality. With a wide clinicalvariability in presentation, diagnosis can be difficult andinvariably requires the biochemical confirmation of excessivecatecholamine production by the tumour. At the First InternationalSymposium on Phaeochromocytoma in October 2005, a panel of expertsrecommended that initial biochemical testing for phaeochromocytomashould include measurements of plasma and urinary metadrenalines.The accumulated evidence clearly indicates that measurementof fractionated metadrenalines in urine or plasma provides superiordiagnostic sensitivity over plasma or urine measurements ofcatecholamines and metabolites. The low prevalence of phaeochromocytomaand paraganglioma (PGL) emphasizes the need to use biochemicaltests of the highest sensitivity. To achieve this, it is recommendedthat the initial biochemical testing for phaeochromocytoma andsecreting PGL should always include the measurements of metadrenalinesin plasma or urine or both.


CiteULike    Complore    Connotea    Del.icio.us    Digg    Reddit    Technorati    What’s this?






This article has been cited by other articles:

Home page Ann Clin BiochemHome page

D. Pillai and S. Callen
Pilot quality assurance programme for plasma metanephrines
Ann Clin Biochem,

March 1, 2010;

47(2):

137 – 142.

[Abstract]
[Full Text]
[PDF]


Home page Ann Clin BiochemHome page

M J Whiting
Simultaneous measurement of urinary metanephrines and catecholamines by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection
Ann Clin Biochem,

March 1, 2009;

46(2):

129 – 136.

[Abstract]
[Full Text]
[PDF]